Tag Archives: cfp

Editor’s Chair: Humor Studies News

Tracy Wuster

 

More recently:

Editor’s Chair: Busy month for humor studies

Hello readers.  Two calls for papers out now for Humor Studies–one from the AHSA and one from the Humor Studies Caucus of the American Studies Association.  See the Announcements page for a few more CFPs, as well. Please remember to send me any announcements, CFPs, etc. to post here and on the AHSA site.

****

Calvin and Hobbes, academia, writing

The Humor Studies Caucus of the American Studies Association is seeking papers for the 2012 ASA Conference:

American Studies Association Annual Meeting: 

“Beyond the Logic of Debt, Toward an Ethics of Collective Dissent,” 

November 21-24, 2013: Hilton Washington, DC

http://www.theasa.net/annual_meeting/page/submit_a_proposal/

Proposals on any aspect of American Humor will be welcome, including, but not limited to:

Stand-Up Comedy      Jokes     Wit           Merriment

Literary Humor  (both high- and low-brow)       Richard Pryor

Film     Satire     Will Rogers

Comedy Jokes     Risibility     Sitcoms

Laughter

Mark Twain     Dirty Jokes    Lenny Bruce

Ventriloquism     the Circus     Marietta Holley

subtle humor     broad humor

Margaret Cho     regional humor

transnational humor     ethnic humor

and even puns…

Proposals due by: January 11th

Panels will be assembled for submission by the January 26 deadline.

Proposals should be no more than 500 words and should include a brief CV (1 page).  Please include current ASA membership status.

Proposals (and questions) should be sent to Tracy Wuster and Jennifer Hughes: wustert@gmail.com & jahughes@yhc.edu

****

American Humor Studies Association

American Literature Association

2013 National Convention

Boston,  Westin Copley Hotel, May 26-29.

The AHSA plans to sponsor two sessions at the 2013 national meeting. We seek cogent, provocative, well-researched papers on the following subjects:

1. “Humor in Periodicals: From Punch to Mad”—Abstracts (300 words max.) are encouraged on the role of humorous literature in American periodicals from the early national period to the present.  Subject adaptable to both humorous periodicals and humor in serious periodicals across a wide time range; thus, title will change to reflect composition of panel.

2. “Reading Humorous Texts”–Abstracts (300 words max.) are encouraged on the interpretation, recovery, or pedagogy of humorous texts from novels and poems to plays and stand-up.  Some focus on the act of interpretation of humor in its historical, performative, formal, or other cultural context is encouraged.

Please e-mail abstracts no later than January 15, 2013 to Tracy Wuster (wustert@gmail.com) with the subject line: “AHSA session, 2013 ALA.” Notifications will go out no later than January 20, 2013.

***

clown mime humor sense of humor cartoon academia

***

Our friend and contributor sent along this announcement:

Persons interested in American humor may have a free and uncopyrighted copy of Scalawag, my biography of John N. Reynolds in Microsoft Word, e-mailed to them as an attachment by sending a request to samsackett1928@gmail.com.  It is not totally funny, but there are several chuckles here and there, and one or two outright laughs.  Included are an amusing folk limerick and two examples of the prose of Walt Mason, one of the great but forgotten American humorists.
I ran across Reynolds while working on my book on E.W. Howe.  After completing the Howe book, I gathered as much material as possible and wrote an account of his life, making it both as factual and as entertaining as I could.  Reynolds has no real importance, but I thought the general public would enjoy reading about him.  I tried to get book publishers to agree with me, but without success.  And I really didn’t have enough for a book anyway (76 pages).  So I am giving it away.
Who was John N. Reynolds?  He was a hard-working college student, a self-ordained minister, a pioneer schoolmaster of brilliant success, a Sunday school superintendent, a newspaper editor, a music storekeeper, a sewing machine agent, a baker, a rogue, an inventor, a penitentiary inmate, a public speaker, a land salesman, a farmer, a candidate for public office, a banker, an itinerant evangelist, an insurance executive, a student of shorthand, an author, a book salesman, and a maniac — in approximately that order, but some of them more than once and some of them simultaneously.  He was also — and in this he was quintessentially human — an enigma.
You can read Scalawag on your computer or print it out.  It’s free.  And if you don’t like it, I’ll gladly refund every penny you paid for it.
Sam Sackett
Advertisements

Big News! News! More News!

Tracy Wuster

Hello all.  Your regularly scheduled post on visual humor has been rescheduled for later this week.  In its place, we have big news, news, and more news.

Big News! 

We are welcoming a new editor to “Humor in America.”  Jeffrey Melton will be taking on the role of “pedagogy editor” and working on creating a series called “Teaching American Humor.”  This series will include his own writings, writings from the current editors, and (most importantly) pieces written by you–the scholars and readers out there who teach humor and are longing for a place to discuss it.  This is your place.

So check out Jeffrey’s pieces:

Teaching American Sitcoms: Ode to The Beverly Hillbillies

Teaching the Irony of Satire (Ironically)

And check out his next post on “Teaching American Sitcoms” next Tuesday.

News

The CFP for the American Humor Studies Association, as well as the Mark Twain Circle of America and the Kurt Vonnegut Society, are posted in the Announcements section of our website, as well as at the website of the AHSA.

AHSA Calls

1. “Humor in Periodicals: From Punch to Mad”—Abstracts (300 words max.) are encouraged on the role of humorous literature in American periodicals from the early national period to the present.  Subject adaptable to both humorous periodicals and humor in serious periodicals across a wide time range; thus, title will change to reflect composition of panel.

2. “Reading Humorous Texts”–Abstracts (300 words max.) are encouraged on the interpretation, recovery, or pedagogy of humorous texts from novels and poems to plays and stand-up.  Some focus on the act of interpretation of humor in its historical, performative, formal, or other cultural context is encouraged.

Please e-mail abstracts no later than January 15, 2013 to Tracy Wuster (wustert@gmail.com) with the subject line: “AHSA session, 2013 ALA.” Notifications will go out no later than January 20, 2013.

Remember: please send me any relevant announcements at: wustert@gmail.com  — I will post them both here and at the AHSA website.

Remember also: you can renew your membership or join the AHSA electronically or by mail.  See here.

Remember as well: we have a Facebook page.  As does the AHSA and the Mark Twain Circle of America.

More News

Last Thursday’s poetry post by Caroline Sposto was featured on the “Freshly Pressed” section of WordPress.  Congratulations to Caroline.  Keep an eye out for future posts on the presidential debate, on the dinner table in family sitcoms, on Halloween music, and more…  and, as always, please consider contributing.

 

Call for Syllabi

Hello all.  Do you teach classes on humor or related topics?

One of our goals here at “Humor in America” is the discussion of humor studies pedagogy.  Such as:

Teaching American Sitcoms: Ode to The Beverly Hillbillies by Jeff Melton

Teaching the Irony of Satire (Ironically) by Jeff Melton

The Subtle (and a little-less-than-subtle) Humor of Charles Chesnutt by Tracy Wuster

Five Subjects Behind: Some thoughts on grunge, time machines, and “Clam Chow-Dah!” by Tracy Wuster

Today, our goal is to extend this conversation by politely request that any and all of you who teach, or have taught, humor studies courses (broadly defined) submit them to us to post here (as well as on the website of the American Humor Studies Association, with your permission of course).  The plan is to create a single post with a number of links to various syllabi as a resource for teachers and scholars.  You can send it as a word doc or pdf.

So, please send us your syllabi for courses on humor, Mark Twain, comics, Kurt Vonnegut, etc. etc. to: wustert@gmail.com ….  Let me know if you have any questions. Thank you.  Tracy, editor.

far side gifted humor education teaching